London's Poverty Profile

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London's Poverty Profile report 2021

COVID-19 and poverty in London

Explore the latest report

London’s Poverty Profile provides evidence on and insight into poverty and inequality in London. It shines a light on these issues to prompt action from local and national government, the third sector, faith groups, practitioners, experts, businesses, the public and indeed anyone who cares about making London a fairer city to live in.

Despite living in a global city with a level of economic performance to be proud of, many Londoners struggle to make ends meet, secure good quality affordable housing, or tie down the decent work they need to lift themselves above the poverty line. As a result, poverty is higher in London than in any other region or country in the UK. Across a wide range of indicators, there is a gulf in outcomes between Londoners on low incomes and those who are better off, both in the capital and across the rest of the UK.

Explore the five themes of London's Poverty Profile to find out more about poverty and inequality in our capital below, as well as new working papers and the latest indicator updates.

Latest indicator updates

June 2021

Work, worklessness and benefits

Housing

People

Living Standards

Shared opportunities

Map of the month:
Gentrification across London

Each month, we release a new map on London's Poverty Profile, developed with our partner Consumer Data Research Centre (CDRC). For June, we focused on data presented in the recently published Runnymede Trust and CLASS report, analysing gentrification in the 2010s to produce a single map showing the whole of London and wider cross-borough trends. There are striking patterns across the city, with a clear inner versus outer London divide and lower levels throughout most of the outer boroughs, particularly Havering, Bexley and Bromley.
Explore the map

Introductory video

For information on how to navigate and access the data, take a look at the below video taken from a Superhighways webinar in July 2020 as our Director of Policy, Manny Hothi, talks you through it.

Additional papers

In July 2020, WPI Economics produced the following working paper looking at the relationship between COVID-19 deaths in London’s neighbourhoods and deprivation:

In November 2020, they produced analysis finding that the most deprived areas in London prior to the COVID-19 crisis have seen the largest increases in claims of unemployment benefits: