Out-of-work benefits map

What does this chart show?
Map of out-of-work benefits by ward

The map shows the proportion of the working-age population claiming an out-of-work benefit* across London in November 2016. The boroughs of North East and East of London contain the highest concentration of wards with more than 10% of people claiming out-of-work benefits. Most boroughs have a mixture of areas with larger or smaller proportions of people claiming an out-of-work benefit. Hackney, Islington and Barking & Dagenham only have a few areas where less than 10% of the working-age population are claiming an out-of-work benefit. Some boroughs such as Barnet, Harrow, Hounslow, Kingston, Richmond, Merton and Sutton contain no areas where more than 10% of the working-age population are claiming an out-of-work benefit. These are all Outer London boroughs. 

The 32 London boroughs, excluding the City of London due to lack of data, contain 624 small areas. These were created so that the census could be analysed using geographical areas with similar population sizes. In just over 70% of these areas the proportion of the working-age population claiming an out-of-work benefit is below 10%. There are a small number of areas (15) where 15% or more of the working-age population is claiming an out-of-work benefit. Six boroughs each have one of these areas but Brent, Kensington & Chelsea and Haringey have two each. Hackney has three. Haringey contains the area with the highest rate of people claiming out-of-work benefits at 20.7%.**  Westminster has the area with the lowest rate of people claiming an out-of-work benefit at 0.3%.***

*  This does not include Universal Credit. UC is not being rolled out evenly across London which means some areas may have a higher proportion of people who are claiming an out-of-work benefit than is shown in the graph.

** Northumberland Park in Haringey

*** Knightsbridge and Belgravia in Westminster.


Data behind the out-of-work benefits map

Out-of-work benefits ward data 44.2 KB

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